No Plungers Allowed: On the injustice of lawsuitphobia trumping the rights of an 8 year old.

Short version first: sign this petition!
Long version second: Sign this petition to help encourage a school district to move past its fear of a lawsuit, and allow a child to both eat lunch with her peers, AND follow the instructions of her medical care provider. The bullet points are thus: Bonnie can’t take food orally. She consumes her food through a tube in her stomach. There are different ways of delivering food through a g-tube, and this is because (and here’s the important part) not all ways work for all people. It’s a trial and error thing. For Bonnie, what works is having her food administered via something called the push/plunge method. This is basically using a medicine syringe on steroids to push the food into the tube.

The school says that this is not allowed because of ‘safety reasons’, though it’s been just fine for the last 4 years, since Bonnie was in kindergarten. She’s now in third grade.   They forbade her Aide to administer the feeds in the method outlined by her care provider, saying instead, that gravity feeds, (basically an open container attached to the tube and held higher than the delivery point, letting gravity ‘drip’ the food into the stomach) or the use of a feeding pump (problem there, being feeding pumps don’t work for all feeds, and Bonnie’s blends are incompatible with pump feeding), were the only methods of acceptable food delivery. Additionally, they placed a further restriction, refusing to allow Bonnie’s mother to come to the school and administer the food herself in the cafeteria; instead, they insist she take Bonnie off the school’s property, before beginning the meal.

The unspoken fear, of course, is that something could go wrong, and there could be a lawsuit. But this method of g-tube feeding  has been used successfully on premature infants, and adults, and every age block in between. Clearly, it’s working for Bonnie, so the change in district policy doesn’t seem to be evidence based.  I’m not a nurse, or a doctor, and I don’t even play one on TV, but I do know how to use the Google, and in about 10 minutes, found a variety of peer reviewed abstracts supporting the use of the plunge method.  I understand that the school wants to keep Bonnie safe, while also mitigating the chances for litigation, should anything go wrong.  The concerns seem to be wildly unlikely instances: that Bonnie’s stomach might explode, (Really.  Someone said that.) or that a blockage may occur, and be unnoticed by the person administering the feed and other unlikely occurrences.  I’m not saying it’s impossible, mind.  Anything’s possible.  But the exploding stomach scenario (which, I’m assuming, is referencing the possibility of the tube being misaligned, and delivering the feed outside of the intended target), is predicated less on the syringe part of the apparatus, and more on the placement of the tube.  In other words, it wouldn’t matter where the food was coming from, if the tube was in wrong.   And blockages happen with gravity feeding, and with pumps, and most tubes come with instructions on how to prevent blockages, and include best practices on how to resolve blockages, should they occur.  

To compare, this would be a little bit like saying that kids who consume food in the traditional oral manner can’t eat on school property because they might choke, or have an allergic reaction.  Except, of course, that choking and allergic reactions are far more prevalent than blockages that don’t get noticed, or exploding stomachs.  I mean, honestly.  If somebody’s stomach exploded, it’d be a bigger HuffPo story than anything relating to Kim Kardashian, amirite?

Al Fresco dining loses its novelty for 8 year old Bonnie

So Bonnie’s lucky, though, because she has awesome family, who go to her school, and set up a card table, along with a portable heater,  and do the whole lunch thing across the street, so that Bonnie doesn’t have to miss out on school–just lunch.  This whole unfortunate debacle has dragged on since February.  Let’s think briefly about February in Oregon, and then let’s all give Bonnie’s mom, Beverly, a round of friggin applause for not just throwing in the towel and homeschooling, because snow.  Of course, the first couple of days of eating in the street were awesome for Bonnie.  Her parents were there, it was new, and different, and they did what they could to make it fun and comfortable for her.  But she’s 8, and the novelty wore off fairly quickly, replaced by an urge to go eat with her friends, ‘”like normal.”

That’s the thing, isn’t it?  There are so many things I know I take for granted, because my kids are largely within the ‘norm’.  School is held up as the great normalizer.  Whole studies have been done on the benefits of sending kids with special needs, or chronic or terminal illnesses, or who are otherwise medically fragile,  to school.   Bonnie’s condition is known as arthrogryposis, and it’s a congenital disorder than can manifest in a variety of ways.  Some of them are pretty bleak–when Bonnie was born, doctors told her parents that she may never be able to sit up in a wheelchair on her own.  But Bonnie beat those odds, and now she’s sitting up at a cafeteria table, on her own.  Or at least, she was, before the school district changed its policy.

So let’s help Bonnie beat the odds again.  Let’s send a message not just to the school district in Oregon, but to public schools across the nation, that care plans devised by medical practitioners should be adhered to by schools.  It’s admirable that schools are taking steps above and beyond to make sure that kids are safe, but the last I checked, you didn’t need a medical degree to become a Superintendent.  There are some decisions that can’t be made via committee meeting, and individual care plans are among them.  Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act has changed the lives of countless kids, by insisting that, if a school takes federal funding, they’re required to make accommodations for special needs students.  Well, that’s a paraphrase.  The relevant bit goes thusly:

Section 504 states (in part):

No otherwise qualified individual with a disability in the United States, as defined in section 705(20) of this title, shall, solely by reason of her or his disability, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance or under any program or activity conducted by any Executive agency or by the United States Postal Service.

So even if we’re assuming that this is an issue outside of the scope of IDEA, or ADA, that tiny sentence about *any program or activity* would most certainly include a school that participates in a free/reduced lunch program.  So even if Bonnie isn’t eating a school lunch, I’d say she’s covered from exclusion by the simple fact that the lunch period exists, and is paid for at least in part, by the government.  I’m not a lawyer, and I don’t know for sure, but that seems to make sense to me.   Regardless, though, isn’t it the RIGHT thing to do?  Let’s pretend, for a minute, that America hasn’t become a nation of people raised on the pabulum of The People’s Court and the OJ trial, where every decision is weighed and measured against the Dementor-like specter of some sort of litigation.  Is it right to segregate a child from her peers, because you disapprove of her food consumption?  Next, shall we send vegetarians out to the garden only?  Kids who chew with their mouths open to feast around the dumpster?  Picky eaters will, of course, be sent home, because ain’t nobody got time for that.  If it’s not disapproval, then perhaps it’s “concern”.  So, shall we segregate those vegetarians we’re concerned about because what if they don’t have a complete protein in their lunch? The open-mouth chewers because they might choke from eating too fast, or taking too big of a bite?  The picky eaters because hypoglycemia and malnutrition are scary possibilities!  Put in that context, it sounds kind of stupid, right?  But there’s a saying, “what has 12 legs and no brain?  A committee.”  Sometimes, people get blinded by paperwork and policy, and they forget about the people they’re serving.  I like to believe, and call me Pollyanna about it all, but I like to believe that if you give people the chance to do the right thing, they’ll take it.  And in this case, I think it might take more than just one tired mama fighting for her kid.

So if you’ve made it this far, congratulations on having an attention span I envy, and thanks!  If you agree, sign the petition, and maybe share it with your friends.  And tell them to share it.  Because the bottom line is, just because it’s not our kid, or our school district right now, that doesn’t mean it couldn’t be in the future.  So let’s help Beverly and Bonnie now, and change things for our kids and grandkids in the future.

*You might notice that this article has achieved a level 10 in linking to outside sources.  I have a few friends who’ve got tube-fed kids, so I had a basic grasp of what was going on with Bonnie.  However, I figured it wouldn’t hurt to provide some info for peeps who needed a crash course.  Feel free to take advantage of my google-fu to assist in your decision making.  That’s what it’s there for.  :)

 

Basic Training: Cloth Diaper Laundering

You’ve decided to go easy on the planet and use cloth diapers on your baby. You’ve picked out your stash, coordinated your covers, and worked through your first 2 days worth of diapers. If you haven’t chosen a diaper service, you are faced with a small pile of pooey laundry. Yikes and double yikes!

Take a deep breath. you can do this.

Depending on the diapering system you’ve chosen, you’ve got a few options for diaper laundry. Generally speaking, you should keep your load under 24 diapers, because you want to leave ample room for agitation, so that every inch of the diaper gets clean. With all systems, you want to do a cold/cold short cycle or soak, followed by a hot/cold cycle. Then, you toss them in the dryer, or hang them on the line till they’re dry. (Some brands recommend air drying, so read the care label before you go chucking everything in the dryer willy nilly.)

EpicNibs in a super cute polka dot pocket dipe. (c)2008 me.

What about soap? The thing about cloth diapers is that they need to be absorbent to do their job. Generally, when you wash clothing with detergent, you’ll get build up, but it’s not something you’d really notice, since you don’t have to worry about clothes absorbing several ounces of water at a time. But over time, regular laundry detergent build up on your cloth diapers leads to leaks. So, if you go with regular detergent, use about a quarter of the recommended amount. If you find that your diapers are repelling (you can test this by dropping a bit of water on the inside of the diaper, and seeing if it’s absorbed, or if it seems to bead up and roll off the diaper) an easy fix is a hot wash with Dawn NON-ULTRA (that’s important, use the classic Dawn) dish detergent, and then several more hot rinse cycles, until you don’t see any bubbles or suds when you lift the lid. If you aren’t squeamish, and the thought of (otherwise clean) diapers in the dishwasher doesn’t freak you out, some moms have found that one run through the sanitize setting on their dishwasher has stopped the repelling issue. If you decide to do that, make sure you don’t use dishwasher soap, and don’t do this with any diapers that have plastic snaps or fasteners, as they will melt.

Some detergents contain enzymes, and some babies are extremely sensitive to enzymes, so if you find yourself battling a diaper rash that won’t go away no matter what, strip your diapers with Dawn non-ultra, do a vinegar rinse to get the excess out, and try a different detergent. If the rash goes away, you know it was a reaction to the enzymes.

You want to stick with detergents that don’t use artificial brighteners, because those can cause both rash issues, and repellency issues. Also, stay away from detergents with fragrance, and definitely don’t use any detergents with added bleach. If you find your diapers are looking especially dingy, (this is more common in hard water areas), you can add a small scoop of an oxygenated detergent like OxyBaby to your first cycle.

There are some moms who exclusively wash with Dawn, because then you never have to worry about repelling issues. For a medium load of diapers, (about 12 to 16 diapers) you want to use about 2 tsp to 1 tbs of Dawn, and for added softness, you can use a generous splash of vinegar. The cold/cold pre-wash/soak, hot/cold wash formula still applies, regardless of the detergent option you’ve chosen.

If you find you have stubborn stains, don’t reach for the Shout! Instead, wait for a sunny day, and lay your diaper out in full sun. This method may take a few days, but it leaves your diapers looking pristine and stain free, without any harsh chemical residue to impede absorption or cause irritation or rash issues.

Always read the label on your diaper, and follow the washing instructions on them.

Posted in baby consumerism Basic Training birth to one year meta-parenting by Jaime. Comments Off on Basic Training: Cloth Diaper Laundering

UnNesting

Unnesting

In two short days, my oldest son heads off to college. This summer has been a bit of a whirlwind in preparation for this moment. I feel rather frazzled as I attempt to get him ready while keeping up with our already hectic daily routine. Where to start? I see the mental notes going by in my head like electric flash cards. I don’t want to miss anything. I am excited and anxious realizing I am new to this arena.

I find myself cleaning, organizing, and thinning out my son’s room. Actually he is cleaning, but I am directing “the weeding out and letting go”. Physical exams and dental cleanings are on the docket; we cannot miss an appointment. “Did he have that vaccine to prevent the disease that claimed the lives of several college students a few years back? Did I time the dental cleaning in order for the next one to coincide with winter break? Did I take good notes at the parent orientation? Have we bought all that he needs, at least enough to get through the first month? Have we talked about the essentials and the not so essential?”

This restlessness feels strangely familiar. And there it is; I am nesting or rather I am UNnesting. I remember 18 years ago, my thoughts were preoccupied with welcoming this new little life to the world outside of my body. Despite my many months of preparation, I still felt unsettled and anxious. I made sure I kept all my medical appointments, ate healthy foods, and avoided unnecessary chemicals. I was aces in my Lamaze class hands down. I wondered if I spent enough time talking, reading and singing (even if that was off key) to this new little one. I decorated a room and fretted over whether I was purchasing the necessary items needed to ensure a smooth transition for the baby from my womb to my arms.

Somewhere in that chaos, I realized that there never is a perfect scenario. In hindsight there tends to always be a desire or wish to have tweaked something just a bit more. I began to understand that in all that hurrying about I was missing the joy of the precious moments: the kicking from within, the hiccups that made my belly dance and my ever developing senses. Seriously, I was becoming super woman with a keen sense of smell, acute hearing and the amazing ability to stay wake for many hours on end (smiles). I could jest about those senses because I was also terribly excited knowing that this new person had so much to offer to the world and I would have the privilege of introducing him or her.

How is it that 18 years later, I am going through much of the same emotions and motions and I not remember the lessons of so long ago? Fortunately, I have remembered before he leaves for college. Today, I stopped the preoccupation with the check list. I stopped and looked my now grown son in the eyes and yes I see he has much to offer the world. He has already started. The very city we live in has honored him by recognizing his talent for design. He has brightened our lives with so much joy, insight and wisdom. Today we sat and talked. We laughed about nothing at all.

My husband and I have two more young ones finding their way. Our nest is reconfiguring. In some ways, the two younger siblings are unnesting and adjusting: realizing the changing of their roles in the family. I believe they take their lead from me and my husband. We have framed this shift in family dynamics with excitement and joy. We cannot wait for the oldest son to have these wonderful adventures that he will eventually share with us. We are all so proud of him and are eager to see him not only fly, but soar beyond belief. We feel his confidence as he stands perched and ready to go.

I do believe I had what was necessary for his first transition from birth to my arms: love, patience, encouragement and joy. Yes there were “things” along the way, but the nest was/ is not about things. As we reminisced with him today, I saw his strength is in the memories of the love, the talk, the time and the energy we put into him. These are the essentials for his next transition. They let him know we believe in his ability to take wing.

Unnesting for me does not have the attitude of one down two to go. It is about preparedness. How do I help the one leaving shift in order to become more independent? Yes, “things” need to be bought and appointments may need to take place. But the preparation to leave home has been happening all along the way. From the moment he was in my arms, I began unnesting. One would never believe that by the fierce mother lioness many know me to be. But it is true. I began preparing for this event the very day he was born. I am so glad that I did take time to enjoy and appreciate the many moments with him. Yes, I found myself temporarily caught up in the frenzy of getting ready for college. But thankfully, I recalled the lesson of long ago. The reminder reinforces my daily understanding that I am in the process of lovingly unnesting two more brilliant beings for the world to behold.

Update: March 9, 2013

How time FLIES! We are three full semesters into my oldest son’s college experience. It has been an amazing journey. Before he left for school, I asked our friends and relatives to write  letters of love and support to him.  I put all of these letters in a binder and presented them as a gift on the day we took him to college. It was my hope that he would look to those letters for hope and inspiration during good and not so good times. I hoped that he would know that he has a constant support system in place  and that we believe in his abilities.

I believe he has navigated this new part of his life quite well.  There are the tangibles: three semesters on the Dean’s List and a  fellowship that lasts until graduation. But I also see subtle signs that show he is going to be just fine on his path. He believes in himself and his abilities and he doesn’t shy away from hard work.  He doesn’t take himself too seriously and he remembers to take time to laugh, to slow down and enjoy the moment.

At home, what does my unnesting look like? Well, family dynamics changed.  The middle son is now the oldest “at home” sibling. In one respect we have raised our expectations for him as we are preparing another loved one for that solo flight. And though I would like to believe the second time around I would be more relaxed I have to say I am almost as aflutter as I was the first time.  Yet I am mindful to stop and be in the moment.  Enjoy the good and learn from the not so good. I am more patient with myself and my son. I am willing to say, “I don’t know, but let’s figure this out together”.  It is a different path for a different child, but the same unrelenting love for my children has me unnesting in preparation for their successful flights. I remain proud and excited to see each one of my children take that awesome maiden voyage.

Posted in Education meta-parenting older kids by Yinsum. Comments Off on UnNesting

ReadyPac recalls apples due to Listeria-includes Burger King, McD’s apple slices

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact
Tristan Simpson
Corporate Communications
626-678-2055

MISSA BAY, LLC ANNOUNCES VOLUNTARY RECALL OF FRUIT, VEGETABLE, AND SANDWICH PRODUCTS CONTAINING APPLES BECAUSE OF POSSIBLE HEALTH RISK

August 10, 2012 – Missa Bay, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Ready Pac Foods, Inc., of Swedesboro, New Jersey is voluntarily recalling a total of 293,488 cases and 296,224 individually distributed units of fruit, vegetable, and sandwich products containing apples, as listed below, with the Use-by dates of July 8, 2012 through August 20, 2012 because they contain diced or sliced apples which may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes is an organism that can cause serious or life-threatening food borne illness in a person who eats a food item contaminated with it. Symptoms of infection may include fever, muscle aches, gastro intestinal symptoms such as nausea or diarrhea. The illness primarily impacts pregnant women and adults with weakened immune systems. Most healthy adults and children rarely become seriously ill.

The recalled products were produced and distributed from the Missa Bay, LLC facility to retailers and foodservice operators in the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Washington D.C., Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire,  New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee,Vermont, Virginia, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

This recall notification is being issued due to finding Listeria monocytogenes on equipment used by Missa Bay, LLC to produce apple products. Missa Bay, LLC is coordinating closely with regulatory officials. No illnesses have been reported in association with this voluntary recall.

Only the specific products identified in the list below are included in the recall. Retailers and foodservice operators should check their inventories and store shelves to confirm that none of the product is present or available for purchase by consumers or in warehouse inventories.

Consumers who may have purchased the affected product are asked to record the Use-by date and/or UPC code number, immediately dispose of the product, and contact the Ready Pac Consumer Affairs Department, toll-free at (800) 800-7822, Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Pacific Time) to obtain a full refund. Please visit our website atwww.readypac.com for a copy of the release.

Ready Pac Foods, Inc. has earned an outstanding safety record for over 40 years and has taken immediate precautionary measures to protect public health by issuing this voluntary recall. Ready Pac customer service representatives have already contacted all customers impacted and are in the process of confirming that the recalled products are not in the stream of commerce. Consumers with questions may contact Ready Pac directly at 1-800-800-7822 M-F 8am-5pm PDT.

Missa Bay, LLC August 10, 2012 Precautionary Voluntary Recall

Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Washington D.C., Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire,  New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

Product Description

Use-by-dates

UPCode

BK Fresh Apple Slices, 2oz, “Burger King” label

On or before August 13

n/a

Snack Pac Apples & Caramel, 4oz, “Hannaford” label

On or before August 18

4126817191

Snack Pac Apples, Granola & Yogurt, 4.3oz, “Hannaford” label

On or before August 18

4126817195

Apple Slices, 1.2oz, “McDonalds” label
(ONLY in the following states:  CT, MA, ME, NH, NJ , NY, PA, RI , VT)

On or before August 19

n/a

Diced Apples for Fruit & Maple Oatmeal, 0.92oz, “McDonalds” label
(ONLY in the following states:  CT, MA, ME, NH, NJ , NY, PA, RI , VT)

On or before August 19

n/a

Fruit & Walnut Snack, 5.75oz, “McDonalds” label

On or before August 20

n/a

Apple Blue Pecan bistro, 4.75oz, “Ready Pac” label

On or before August 12

7774529497

Fruit Frenzy, 32oz, “Ready Pac” label

On or before August 18

7774523086

Fruit Tray Bien, 32oz, “Ready Pac” label

On or before August 18

7774521606

Ready Snax Apples, Cheese with Caramel Dip, 4oz, “Ready Pac” label

On or before August 18

7774523896

Ready Snax Apples, Celery, Raisins with Peanut Butter, 4oz, “Ready Pac” label

On or before August 18

7774523897

Ready Snax Apples, Granola & Yogurt, 4.3oz, “Ready Pac” label

On or before August 18

7774523089

Super Fruit Blend, 6oz, “Ready Pac” label

On or before August 17

7774523076

Super Fruit Medley, 10.5oz, “Ready Pac” label

On or before August 16

7774523746

Sweet Sunshine Platter, 37oz, “Ready Pac” label

On or before August 16

7774524204

Product Description

Use-by-dates

UPCode

Apple, Blue Cheese & Pecan Complete Salad Kit, 8.75oz, “Safeway Farms” label

On or before August 18

2113033680

Apple Caramel Dipper, 6.7oz, “Wawa” label

On or before August 16

2619100394

Apple Peanut Butter Dipper, 6.5oz, “Wawa” label

On or before August 15

2619100268

Apple Slices, 3.5oz, “Wawa” label

On or before August 16

2619102232

Baby Carrots, 3oz, “Wawa” label

On or before August 16

2619102517

Chicken Salad Snack, 6.7oz, “Wawa” label

On or before August 12

2619102760

Chicken Salad Sandwich, 7.8oz, “Wawa” label

On or before August 10

2619105670

Fruit & Cheese, 6oz, “Wawa” label

On or before August 11

2619102567

Protein Power Pack, 7.8oz, “Wawa” label

On or before August 11

2619102565

Red Grapes, 3oz, “Wawa” Label

On or before August 13

2619102518

Turkey & Cheese Sandwich, 7.7oz, “Wawa” label

On or before August 10

2619105622

Apples, Celery, Raisins & Peanut Butter, 4oz, “Wegmans” label

On or before August 18

7789026744

Apples, Cheese & Caramel Dip, 4oz, “Wegmans” label

On or before August 15

7789026743

Apples, Granola & Low Fat Vanilla Yogurt, 4.3oz, “Wegmans” label

On or before August 18

7789026737

 

Instructions for Consumers:

Check your refrigerator for the above listed products with the Use-By dates July 8, 2012 through August 20, 2012. The location of the Use-by date and UPCode varies by product.

Consumers who may have purchased the affected product are asked to record the Use-By date and/or UPC code number, immediately dispose of the product, and contact the Ready Pac Consumer Affairs Department, toll-free at (800) 800-7822, Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Pacific Time) to obtain a full refund. Please visit our website atwww.readypac.com for a copy of the release.

Instructions to Retailers:

Retailers should check their inventories and store shelves to confirm that none of the product is present or available for purchase by consumers or in warehouse inventories. Ready Pac customer service representatives have already contacted retailers and are in the process of confirming that the recalled products are not in the stream of commerce. Customers with questions may contact Ready Pac directly at 1-800-800-4088 x2900 M-F 7am-5pm PDT.

Posted in health and wellness nutrition Product Recalls by Jaime. Comments Off on ReadyPac recalls apples due to Listeria-includes Burger King, McD’s apple slices

Winning the award for the strangest Product Recall of the year: Moldy baseball gloves

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 6, 2011
Release #11-271
Firm’s Recall Hotline: (800) 451-7913
CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772

Mizuno USA Inc. Recalls Baseball and Softball Gloves Due to Presence of Mold

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Name of Product: Mizuno Supreme Series and Ballpark Pro baseball and softball gloves

Units: About 131,000

Importer: Mizuno USA Inc., of Norcross, Ga.

Hazard: Some gloves were found to contain a variety of molds that could cause respiratory or other infections in individuals with chronic health problems, or in individuals who have impaired immune systems.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported.

Description: The recalled items are leather Mizuno baseball and softball gloves. The gloves have a sewn-in white label on the heel of the glove with the words “Made in Vietnam” and the model number. Supreme Series gloves affected are further identified by the date code imprinted on the heel of the glove near the thumb opening. The following models are affected by this recall:

Model Description Date Code
GSP1251TG The glove is dark brown on the top and palm sides with a yellow wrist strap. The words “SUPREME SERIES” are stamped into the palm of the gloves. SV0910
SV1110
SV1210
SV0111
SV0311
GSP1300T The glove is light tan on the top and palm sides with a dark brown wrist strap and dark brown bindings. The words “SUPREME SERIES” are printed in dark brown on the palm of the gloves. SV0310
GSP1401TG The glove is dark tan on the top and palm sides with a brown wrist strap and dark brown bindings. The words “SUPREME SERIES” are printed in dark brown on the palm of the gloves. SV0610
SV0910
SV1010
SV1110
SV0111
SV0311
MMX122P The glove is dark brown on the top and palm sides with a dark brown wrist strap and dark brown bindings. The words “BALLPARK PRO” are printed in gold on the palm of the gloves. N/A
MMX115PWM The glove is tan on the top and palm sides with a light tan wrist strap and dark brown bindings. The words “BALLPARK PRO” are printed in dark brown on the palm of the gloves. N/A
MMX130 The glove is tan on the top with dark brown palm and webbing and tan wrist strap and bindings. The words “BALLPARK PRO” are printed in gold on the palm of the gloves. N/A

Sold at: Walmart and Target stores nationwide from April 2010 through May 2011 for between $24 and $60.

Manufactured in: Vietnam

Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the gloves and contact Mizuno USA to receive a full refund.

Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Mizuno USA Inc. at (800) 451-7913 between 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. ET Monday through Friday.


GSP1251TG front and back
GSP1251TG front and back
 
GSP1300T front and back
GSP1300T front and back
 
GSP1401TG front and back
GSP1401TG front and back
 
MMX122P front and back
MMX122P front and back
 
MMX115PWM front and back
MMX115PWM front and back
MMX130 front and back
MMX130 front and back


To look at him, so improbably there; on parenting a preemie, 9 years later.

Max was born eight years and 359 days ago, in an OR where I later spent the majority of my work life, tying the OB’s gown too tight if he had annoyed me and giving cricoid pressure,until anesthesia said go. I don’t remember it. It’s partly the interposing nine years, it’s partly the decade I haven’t slept a full night, it’s mostly the Versed I got because I was crying with anxiety. Versed is an anxiolytic, and a good one; it’s also an amnesiac. I don’t remember anything from grabbing a CD for the OR until an hour later, when I feebly protested Max being supplemented with formula until they told me his glucose was 22.

When I see my section scar, I don’t think of my surgery, or of how it changed his sister’s birth so profoundly four years later. I think of the hour I’m missing. An hour, it’s such a short time — it’s a medium-long commute, half of a movie, a CD length — but in that particular hour was my son’s birth. He had beautiful blue eyes and an Apgar of 4. I’m not sorry that I don’t remember them bagging him, or the studied calm of the pediatrician as he listened; I know all of those things and how they look and how the Ambu bag smells faintly of plastic and the feel of it refilling in your hand. I know that everyone was calm and spoke in measured voices and that the laryngoscope and ET tube appeared smoothly at the pediatrician’s right, and I know that their eyebrows raised above their masks as they considered intubation. I know all these things, because I did them for hundreds of babies later while their mothers were sewn back up, usually not even aware that their baby was not breathing. I don’t need to remember them.

This is what I remember: my son, 3900 grams at 36 weeks EGA, nursing like a full-termer. I remember his carseat tolerance test. I remember the oh-so-slow laps we took around the unit. I remember nursing him in his room on Infants Medical at Children’s during his readmit. I remember taking him home for good. I remember waking up in the night to look at him, so improbably there. I remember how his head smelled,when he slept. I remember all the days and nights in the nine years since, and that missing hour matters less to me. Last night I checked,on him as he slept, sprawled open-mouthed in his too-small pajamas, the blankets kicked down around his feet, and if I closed my eyes he sounded just like he did those first long nights together. I still marvel that he’s here. I still kiss him while he sleeps and whisper in his ear. I still remember.

The wind at your back: On why I hate potty training.

Dear Person Who Designs Building Layouts,

I feel like I might be over-stepping, given that all of my CAD classes were ones that I was in while cutting algebra, and I basically flunked my technical drawing classes, cuz they were the last period of the day, and, well, everyone knows that’s when you get the best end-of-day-sales on dimebags in stairwell G.

That being said, I have some suggestions that I think might help you become more efficient at your chosen profession.

When you’re designing, say, a bar, the location of the bathroom is important, but not crucial. One would hope that it would be close enough to the bar to avoid any drunken accidents, but you know, it IS a bar after all.

Or an office building. I’m pretty sure the standard is one or two on each floor, plus one in the cafeteria, (especially if your cafeteria plans on ‘mystery meat and succotash Tuesdays’.)

But when you are planning a bookstore, with a large, dedicated children’s section, putting the bathroom on the ENTIRE OPPOSITE SIDE AND END of the store is just sadistic and cruel. To wit. Imagine you’ve got a 3 year old, who is enthralled with ‘The Pigeon Wants a Puppy’. And you are six months pregnant, and have stopped off in the bookstore, because you know they have chairs! Chairs!!! Where you can sit! So you’re sitting, after 6 hours of shopping. With a 3 year old. And did I mention that you’re 6 months pregnant? Which means that you basically look (and feel) like you’re housing a small Panamanian family under your shirt. And then you hear, ‘I better poop, before I poop in my panties!’ So, you pitch the book aside, and take said toddler by the hand. You breeze past your partner, and almost bowl over a cute, but VERY SLOW set of year-old twins. You toss a ‘sorry! potty!’ over your shoulder at the mother who is looking at you with that ‘I will never let my kid wait THAT LONG to poop’ look, and you’re thinking ‘HA! and I only had to potty train one kid. bitch.’

Dear architect, I know that it is not your fault that bookstores eschew straight lines in favor of serpentine, labyrinthine layouts, requiring lots of weaving through the aisles, and past display tables, all full of interesting, shiny things that can distract a ground-level 3 year old. But this just brings me back to my point. Because after you make that long and winding marathon trek across the store, with the wind at your back, and a lump of scatalogical terror in your throat, and you’ve pantsed your kid and plunked her on the potty, and all she does is fart?

You basically want everyone involved in the store layout to die a painful, eyes pecked out by angry roosters sort of death.

Love,
A mother.

Infant Food Product Recall: SimplyThick thickening agent recalled.

The Food and Drug administration is warning parents not to feed their infants SimplyThick gel.

SimplyThick is a brand of thickening agent available to customers and medical centers that help manage swallowing difficulties in infants.

The FDA is warning parents to not feed the thickening product to infants before 37 weeks gestation because it could cause a life-threatening condition. They also advice not to feed the gel to premature infants, including those in the hospital and those sent home from the hospital within the past 30 days.

Some symptoms to watch for are a bloated stomach, greenish-tinged vomiting, and bloody stools.


Products affected are 15 g, 30 g, 120 g and 240 g pouches.
All 15 g pouches are affected
All 30 g pouches are affected
Some 120 g pouches – identified as those with a “TP” in the lot code stamped into the edge of the packet.
Some 240 g pouches – identified as those with a “TP” in the lot code stamped into the edge of the packet.

SimplyThick item numbers affected
ALL 01001, 01005, 01007, 02001, 02005, and 02007
SOME 01004, 02004, 01006 and 02006 – identified as those with a “TP” in the lot code stamped into the edge of the packet.
SimplyThick item numbers are included as part of the UPC barcode on our packaging. The item number is the second group of 5 digits in the UPC barcode.

All products have a code embossed or stamped in the foil. The first 6 digits of that code represent a “best if used by” date in MMDDYY format. ANY date code that falls between 062610 (i.e. June 26, 2010) and 062612 (i.e. June 26, 2012) and contains the letter code “TP” in the code are affected by the recall.

An example of an affected date code is: 0312125TP1. The code breakdown would be the “Best If Used By Date”, 03/12/12 – i.e. March 12, 2012 AND it contains “TP” in the code .

Packets Code Dates Affected:

15 g packets (Nectar Individual Packets):

Embossed / Imprinted Date
080110#TP#
080210#TP#
082110#TP#
082210#TP#
082310#TP#
082410#TP#
082810#TP#
082910#TP#
092610#TP#
092710#TP#
092810#TP#
100310#TP#
101710#TP#
101810#TP#
101910#TP#
111310#TP#
111410#TP#
111510#TP#
111610#TP#
120410#TP#
121110#TP#
121210#TP#
010111#TP#
010211#TP#
010511#TP#
012911#TP#
013011#TP#
031311#TP#
031411#TP#
031511#TP#
032611#TP#
032711#TP#
032811#TP#
032911#TP#
041711#TP#
041811#TP#
050211#TP#
050311#TP#
050411#TP#
052111#TP#
052211#TP#
052311#TP#
052411#TP#
052511#TP#
052811#TP#
062611#TP#
062711#TP#
062811#TP#
062911#TP#
073111#TP#
080111#TP#
080211#TP#
080311#TP#
080411#TP#
080611#TP#
082711#TP#
082811#TP#
082911#TP#
091711#TP#
091811#TP#
091911#TP#
102911#TP#
103011#TP#
103111#TP#
110111#TP#
110211#TP#
110311#TP#
111211#TP#
111311#TP#
111411#TP#
111511#TP#
112011#TP#
112611#TP#
112711#TP#
120411#TP#
120511#TP#
120611#TP#
121011#TP#
121111#TP#
121211#TP#
121311#TP#
123111#TP#
010112#TP#
012212#TP#
012312#TP#
012412#TP#
012812#TP#
012912#TP#
013012#TP#
013112#TP#
020912#TP#
021212#TP#
021312#TP#
021412#TP#
021812#TP#
021912#TP#
031012#TP#
031112#TP#
031212#TP#
031312#TP#
031412#TP#
031912#TP#
032012#TP#
041412#TP#
041512#TP#
041612#TP#
050512#TP#
050612#TP#
050712#TP#
050812#TP#
050912#TP#
052112#TP#
052212#TP#
060212#TP#
060312#TP#
060412#TP#
060512#TP#

30 g Packets (Honey Individual Packets):

Embossed / Imprinted Date
062610#TP#
062710#TP#
080210#TP#
080310#TP#
082910#TP#
090410#TP#
090510#TP#
100310#TP#
100410#TP#
100510#TP#
101610#TP#
101710#TP#
120410#TP#
120510#TP#
120610#TP#
121210#TP#
121310#TP#
010211#TP#
010311#TP#
010411#TP#
030711#TP#
030811#TP#
030911#TP#
031211#TP#
031311#TP#
041611#TP#
041711#TP#
041911#TP#
042011#TP#
043011#TP#
050111#TP#
052811#TP#
052911#TP#
053011#TP#
060411#TP#
061811#TP#
061911#TP#
062011#TP#
080611#TP#
080711#TP#
080811#TP#
082911#TP#
083011#TP#
083111#TP#
091011#TP#
091111#TP#
091211#TP#
091711#TP#
100811#TP#
100911#TP#
101011#TP#
110511#TP#
110611#TP#
110711#TP#
110811#TP#
111911#TP#
112011#TP#
121011#TP#
121111#TP#
121211#TP#
121311#TP#
123111#TP#
010112#TP#
012212#TP#
012312#TP#
012812#TP#
012912#TP#
013012#TP#
013112#TP#
022012#TP#
022112#TP#
031712#TP#
031812#TP#
031912#TP#
041512#TP#
041612#TP#
041712#TP#
050512#TP#
050612#TP#
050712#TP#
050812#TP#
052212#TP#
052612#TP#
052712#TP#
052812#TP#

120g Packets (Nectar Bulk Packets)

Embossed / Imprinted Date
062710#TP#
080410#TP#
103110#TP#
110110#TP#
121910#TP#
122010#TP#
012911#TP#
030711#TP#
030811#TP#
070211#TP#
070311#TP#
070411#TP#
080811#TP#
102211#TP#
102311#TP#
120411#TP#
021812#TP#
032412#TP#
060912#TP#
061012#TP#

240g Packets (Honey Bulk Packets)

Embossed / Imprinted Date
062710#TP#
062810#TP#
080410#TP#
110110#TP#
110210#TP#
112010#TP#
112110#TP#
121810#TP#
121910#TP#
012911#TP#
013011#TP#
030611#TP#
030711#TP#
070211#TP#
070311#TP#
070411#TP#
080911#TP#
102311#TP#
102411#TP#
120511#TP#
120611#TP#
120711#TP#
021912#TP#
022012#TP#
032512#TP#
061012#TP#
061112#TP#

Posted in health and wellness News You Can Use! nutrition Product Recalls Safety by Jaime. Comments Off on Infant Food Product Recall: SimplyThick thickening agent recalled.

Things They Don’t Tell You: A comic for the rest of us

Ruby Bridges and me: Diversity on the school front

The story of Ruby Bridges, the first African American child to attend an all white elementary school in the South has conjured many emotions for me throughout my life. My sentiments evolved from being an African American student at predominantly white schools to being a parent of African American children at predominantly white schools. While the times may have changed, many of the complex feelings about integration remain the same.

As a child, I often wished to see more faces like mine, not just on the playground or as a roommate, but among the faculty as well. Granted my experience was not like Ruby’s in that I did not require armed guards to escort me to school and I did not sit in a classroom absent of other children. I had many friends that I still have connections with today. Like Ruby, I knew my family had high hopes for my success in these new arenas. Honestly, I simply wanted to be accepted among my peers as I think most children desire. Ruby has said that as a child she thought the protesters were part of a Mardi gras parade; her innocence allowed some space from the ugliness. I was much older than Ruby when I started attending predominantly white schools and therefore I was more cognizant of when respect and understanding for cultural and social differences existed and when it did not.

As a mother, I find myself back to balancing the scales: getting the proportions right feels far more daunting as a parent than they did as a teenager. Receiving a prized education does not tip the scales to counter balance a lack of cultural understanding where my children are concerned. I will add that I am most grateful to pioneers like Ruby, her parents, my family and other families for taking such steps in the world. I do not fault or criticize their decisions. I do acknowledge that there are elements to the equation of developing the “whole child” that have not been given their due.

*Diversity in schools should mean more than having faces of different colors. If you are searching for a school to hold your child/ children of color as an equal member of its village, then I suggest you consider asking if the school respects your cultural language. A school shows that it respects your cultural language by striving to understand and incorporate cultural nuances that members of a predominant society may not have exposure to. Diversity is not assimilation. Assimilation is window dressing with no commitment to walking the walk of diversity. The richness of experiencing my children’s culture and understanding their cultural points of reference is  just as rewarding for their white peers.

A school that is willing to learn and embrace your cultural language does not dismiss or explain away your concerns with a dogmatic attachment to the way it has always done things. It understands you are not trying to flip the school on its head with your suggestions: the very fact that you are at the school shows you are open to its pedagogy. I understand that conversations about race and culture can make for difficult subject matter especially in the U.S.  But in this day and age if I am to trust a school in the co-parenting of my children (yes schools co-parent your children; they are teaching your children many lessons- some academic some not) it must be able to have those very difficult conversations.

Ultimately the level of cultural enrichment and embracing you raise your child with is up to you. You have to determine whether or not you are at ease in navigating those racial conversations with schools. For me, such conversations are necessary and must move from talk to action. An action that says, “I see you and strive to understand that which I do not. I don’t dismiss or belittle your point of view because it is not my own”. The school must realize that you are not declaring anyone a racist, you are simply asking, “have you ever considered viewing said situation this way. And now that you have a window to this view, what are you willing/ going to do differently?” The school should see how beneficial this shift in thinking is for the entire school community.

Cultural languages very among people even within an identified group, remember no one group is a monolith. Yet a healthy awareness of climate and culture lends itself to better relations. There is the infamous “Doll Test” where children identify bad, ugly and other negative terms with the black doll and associate positive terminology with the white doll. Many mothers or children or color are well aware of how powerful those images are and are working to turn the tide on that sentiment at home and at school. As a parent, if you approach the school with ideas of how to counteract that way of thinking, the response should be one of open dialogue not resistance or defensiveness. Your suggestions could vary from one story about brown people does not change things to can we just sing some songs during Black history month. The point is have the conversation and you decide where your level of comfort is in line with the school’s answer.

Positive terminology about people of color is another component of cultural language. Not saying anything negative doesn’t counter balance the effects of negative stereotypes. Constant work, experiences and teaching offset the ill effects of prejudice.  There are countless stories around the US about the behavior of children of color being viewed as negative even when it is the equivalent of their white peers. Traditionally, I believe children of color have been told by their parents to behave above and beyond the standard of the well behaved child in such schools. When moments arise and a parent has concerns that his child is being singled out, the school should be aware that “I wonder if “ thoughts are a possibility for such parents. The “I wonder if’s” are normal and the school should approach those questions as such. Again no one is implying someone is a racist. The question is point of view.

If a teacher views a child or color questioning a matter as resistant or confrontational versus viewing a white child’s questioning as inquisitive perhaps a teacher may not be aware of subliminal thought placed there by our society. We all have unconscious buttons that might lead us to act in a way we believe is contrary to our thinking. The point here is for the teacher/ school to be willing to engage this conversation and hear the concerns of the parent: imagine themselves in the parent’s shoes. How many times people of color shook have their heads thinking not again when a white person falsely blames a black person for a crime in order to shake police off the trail?

The “I wonder ifs” are part of the cultural language for many African Americans. When we are followed in the store by security, pulled over by police, turned down for rentals the “I wonder ifs” have played out in our heads. Well, I can only speak from my experience and the examples above are mine. Therefore when I approach a school and I wonder if…, I hope it understands why I have that internal dialogue.

Moreover, when my children are harmed or threatened, I want to know that my children will be protected and held as loved members of that community. I want to know my children are believed, respected and cared for even if it means acknowledging that the injury was done by their white peers. I live in the South and there is a history that speaks to the sense that injury inflicted by the hands of white people bears no need for punishment. This cultural language/ understanding is within the historic belief that a black life does not matter. Some of you might be familiar with the Jim Crow South and how blacks were beaten, terrorized and killed while few if any people were punished for such atrocities. It is most important for me that a school charged with the noble task of educating my children realizes that inaction around such issues sends the message that black lives are not of importance. The inability to see how the school can send such a message is a deal breaker in my family. Here again I speak from personal experience and my response is the school does not deserve the right to educate my children nor does it have my trust for holding them. This tipped the scale to where we say no more.

I am curious about other cultural languages or languages of diversity (Latino, Asian, Native-American, gay, lesbian, disabled). What are some of yours? What are deal breakers for you? More importantly, when we witness a dismissal of someone cultural language (and we say we are a community) then our job/ our humanity is to speak up on behalf of making things right.

*To me diversity in education refers to race, ethnicity, economics, gender orientation, and mental and physical abilities. However for the purposes of this article, I am discussing my experience with racial diversity